Organic Vegetable & Herb Seeds

Let’s grow our own fresh, organic produce in the backyard or even on the lanai.  With the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization reporting a 12.6% increase in February 2022, it’s time we start our own vegetable, fruit and herbs. Hawaiian Volcanic Organic Seeds, Fertilizers, Compost, Coconut Coir & Chips, Potting Soil, Indigenous Soil, and more, allows all of us to enjoy the benefits of organic produce and make sure our Families are eating healthy, pesticide free, fresh low-cost produce.

My goal is to provide high-quality seeds so you can grow delicious food in your own yard. With our guidance, you can provide for your Family and beat these record-high food prices.

We will provide our organic seeds in a water-proof, zip lock container that keeps seeds fresh longer.  No more paper seed packets that tear easily and are messy.  Each variety of vegetable, herb and fruit seed will have a QR code QR Code that you can scan and will have a wealth of information.

  • Complete Description
  • History of the Plant
  • Fertilizer Requirements
  • Planting Season
  • Planting Directions
  • Companion Plants
  • Weight or Approximate Number of Seeds
  • Recipes

Seeds From University Of Hawaii

Anuenue is a smooth leaf variety that forms a larger head and has a more crisp texture than Manoa lettuce. It does ideal under cool weather and lower elevations. Tolerates hot temperatures where bolting is an issue. Matures in 50-60 days.

4.4/5

Puakea is a white vaiety slightly smaller than normal cauliflower with heads ranging from 3-4 inches in diameter.

4.5/5

#9 is a sweet and crispy open-pollinated variety of supersweet corn. Can be grown all year round and matures in about 68-75 days after planting. (Later in winter months). Great for back yard gardening. Highly resistant to Maize Mosaic virus.

4.5/5

“White” is a sister of the #9 yellow open-pollinated variety with silvery white kernels. Matures in about 68-75 days.

4.5/5

Hybrid #10 is a Hybrid that is a 3-Way cross. Current stock is a nice Bi-color corn with outstanding sweetness and tenderness. Matures in about 70 days. Resistant to Rust fungus.

4.4/5

Awahia is a short day pungent variety with red skin and good storage life. Matures in 150-160 days.

4.5/5

Waialua chili pepper is a Jalapeno shaped, weighing about 26g. Matures in about 75-80 days. Pepper is resistant to Bacterial Wilt and is tolerant to root knot nematodes. Fruits mature to a beautiful red color and is sweeter flavored than Jalepeno. Fruits are about 1.5 to 2 inches in length.

4.5/5

Hawaiian chili pepper is a popular variety used in various “local” food preparations. Although the Hawaiian pepper’s small size may be deceiving, it packs quite a punch and are considerably hot. The pepper averages 1 inch in length.

4.5/5

Long oriental type eggplant but in a nice light green color. Very tender and excellent for cooking. Fruits are 8-12 inches in length. Matures in 4 months. Excellent producer for backyard gardens.

4.4/5

Is a “New” long oriental type eggplant that was developed for wilt resistance. This new release was from former Vegetable Specialist, Dr K. Takeda’s collection. Fruits are 10-12 inches in length. Very nice dark glossy purple color. Matures in about 3-4 months.

4.5/5

Kai Choy or mustard cabbage that is White Rust Resistant. Excellent for backyard gardens. This variety was a selection from a Molokai farmer (Mr Hirayama). Matures in 45-50 days.

4.5/5

Kai Choy or mustard cabbage has nice dark color and fine taste that matures in about 45- 50 days. Slightly tolerant to white rust fungus disease.

4.5/5

The root of the Yam bean (Jicama) is edible with a crisp and crunchy texture. Ideal if planted in August and September. Tubers development begins at flowering as days begin to shorten and days get cooler. Harvest in 5-6 months. Roots weigh 1.5 -3 pounds.

4.4/5

Prolific producing grape type tomato. Determinate, bush growing tomato (staking is recommended as developing fruits will weigh down the supporting branches). Fruits can be vine ripened weighing approximately 10-14 grams. Excellent shelf-life. Matures in 80-85 days.

4.5/5

N-63 is an indeterminate tomato plant with green shouldered fruits. Resistant to the common root knot nematode, fusarium wilt, gray leaf spot and one strain of spotted wilt virus with tolerance to tobacco mosaic virus.

4.5/5

Kewalo is a determinate tomato plant with uniform ripening. Fruits approx. 6-8oz. Matures in 75-80 days. It is tolerant to bacterial wilt as well as tobacco mosaic virus. Resistant to the common root knot nematode, fusarium wilt, gray leaf spot and one strain of spotted wilt virus.

4.5/5

Healani is a determinate tomato plant with uniform ripening. Fruits approx. 6-8oz. Matures in 75-80 days. Oblique fruit shape. Resistant to the common root knot nematode, fusarium wilt, gray leaf spot and one strain of spotted wilt virus. It is also tolerant to tobacco mosaic virus.

4.4/5

Heirloom Seeds

Also known as Cherokee Black, the variety is good as both a snap and a dry bean; when mature, the greenish-purple 6” pods encase shiny jet-black seeds. 

4.4/5

This old-time favorite, introduced in 1900, is regaled for its quality and delicious wax bean flavor. The stringless pods reach 5-7″ long on heavy-producing plants that grow 15-20″ tall. Ideal for freezing or canning. Bush habit, wax, 50-65 days. ±1,100 seeds/lb

4.5/5

Bred at the University of New Hampshire by the late Professor Elwyn Meader. Introduced by the Billy Hepler Seed Company in 1957. Distinctive purple foliage and purple flowers. Bright purple, stringless, slightly curved 5″ pods turn green when cooked.

4.5/5

(aka Preacher Bean) Distinctive dark green pods streaked with purple grow up to 8″ long. Light buff seeds splashed with dark brown, resembling a rattlesnake’s coloration. Very fine flavor.

4.5/5

Known as the most dependable early green bean, this easy-to-grow variety offers excellent flavor and is one of the best for freezing and canning. It germinates well in cooler soil, adapts to diverse soil and climate conditions, and is disease-resistant. 

4.4/5

Our very best snap bean for fresh eating, freezing, or processing, the Empress bean offers incredible flavor. The vigorous plants produce heavy yields of large, straight, green, 5-6” stringless pods. Plant in succession for fresh beans throughout the season.

4.5/5

A great dual purpose bean. Long thin pods are stingless and good for snap beans. The dry beans are excellent for soups and retain their markings when cooked. Very productive. Bush habit, 60 days for snaps, 80 days for dry beans

4.5/5

(aka Amish Knuttle) Cutshort-type bean packed with small square seeds that are white speckled with rose. Prized for delicious flavor despite strings. Also excellent as a dry bean. Pole habit, snap or dry, 100 days.

4.5/5

Donated to SSE in 1989 by Ralph Blackwell of Alabama. Ralph’s family grew this variety for over a hundred years and his mother used it to make a dish similar to sauerkraut. Plants grow to 2′ tall with blue-green leaves and purple stems/veins.

4.4/5

Also known as Special Dark Green, this variety was introduced around 1910 by the Jerome B. Rice Seed Company of Cambridge, New York. It originated with George Starr of Royal Oak, Michigan, who discovered it in a crop of Davis Perfect (now extinct).

4.5/5

This well-balanced mix of cutting lettuces brings any salad to life. Consisting of tender Australian Yellowleaf, flavorful Forellenschluss, mild Lolla Rossa, striking Red Velvet, and at least four more of our favorite varieties, this cut-and-come-again mix will have a colorful salad on the table within weeks of planting. 40-45 days.

4.5/5

Slightly ruffled leaves are crunchy and sweet, making this variety a standout for salads, lettuce wraps, and sandwiches. Plants with buttery- green hearts grow upright and reach 10-12″ tall, and resist tipburn and are mosaic virus tolerant. Leaves can be harvested at any size.

4.5/5

Superb snap pea reportedly grown in the Amish community long before present snap pea types. Vines grow 5-6′ tall and are covered in 2″ translucent green pods. Yields over a 6-week period if kept picked. Delicate and sweet even when the seeds develop.

4.4/5

This corno-di-toro (“horn of the bull”) type of sweet pepper earned high marks from Seed Savers Exchange staff at a 2014 tasting at our Heritage Farm headquarters. Curved, tapered fruit mature from green to red, have thin walls, and taste very sweet (not hot).

4.5/5
This gorgeous, versatile, and delicious blocky pepper originates from Italy and is ideal for stuffing, frying, and canning, with a heat level that ranges from mild to hot. Pendant fruits measure 4 to 5 inches long by 2 to 2.5 inches wide. Its medium-thick flesh matures from green to red, and plants measure 18 to 24 inches tall. (70-80 days).
4.5/5

From SSE member Larry Pierce of Cabool, Missouri. Named Traveler because Larry carried this seed with him when he moved to Oklahoma, Wyoming, and then Missouri. Sturdy plants covered in cylindrical fruits that average 3″ long. Fruits ripen from green to bright red. 

4.5/5
The Yellow Pear Tomato is a very popular pear-shaped yellow heirloom cherry tomato variety. These bright tomatoes have a subtly sweet fresh taste and a cheerful yellow peel. The large indeterminate plants are quite productive, producing many clusters of tomatoes up until frost.
4.4/5

A top-quality, late-maturing onion with golden, globe-shaped bulbs weighing an average of 1 pound, this variety hails from northern Italy. It has a mild, sweet taste when fresh, but its flavor intensifies when it is stored. One of the best onions varieties for storage.

4.5/5

This historic variety originated in Japan and was introduced to the United States by the mid-1930s by seedsmen such as Henry A. Dreer of Philadelphia. Plants bear cream-colored, cylindrical shaped fruits filled with spaghetti-like strands of delicately flavored flesh.

4.5/5

In the early 1900s Chelsea, Iowa was famous for melons grown on the sandy hills north of town. Farmers would fill their horse-drawn “triple box” wagons in the field, haul them to town, and sell the melons right from the wagons.

4.5/5

Eye-popping and scrumptious with bright pink sweet flesh and black seeds, this variety produces fruits that are about 2′ long and weigh 10-16 pounds. Introduced in 1924 as Sun, Moon and Stars by Peter Henderson & Co of New York.

4.4/5

(C. chinense) (aka Lucifer’s Dream) Caribbean favorite many times hotter than the jalapeño. Three-foot tall plants produce enormous yields of small rippled peppers with a characteristic fruity flavor and aroma. 90-100 days from transplant. Sizzling hot.

4.4/5

Organic Seeds coming soon!

Let us know which seed you are looking for.